Intimidating other words

31-Mar-2020 14:48 by 2 Comments

Intimidating other words

"Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo" is a grammatically correct sentence in American English, often presented as an example of how homonyms and homophones can be used to create complicated linguistic constructs.It has been discussed in literature in various forms since 1967, when it appeared in Dmitri Borgmann's Beyond Language: Adventures in Word and Thought.

Although I want to focus on verbs, as a fan of the British comic , I can’t resist a quick diversion into ‘menace’ as a noun.

He was crushed, which made me feel horrible as soon as I realized that it would have that effect.

Depriving someone of their beliefs, values, faith, or enthusiasm is one of the worst things that you could to someone so in order to turn it around on them and gain ground when this happens, the word, dispirit, can be thrown at them.

Also, why was the tweet described as ‘menacing’ rather than ‘threatening’ or even ‘intimidating’?

While all these three synonyms convey a sense of fear, danger, or unpleasantness being used to achieve an aim, there are some interesting nuances of meaning that differentiate them.

Intimidation usage: “I hear only rambling and mumbling when you speak; there is no .” 2.

Dispirit I remember when I told my younger brother that Santa wasn’t real.

ADMONISH - BEAT DOWN - BLUDGEON - BROWBEAT - BULLDOZE - BULLYRAG - CASTRATE - DENOUNCE - DISQUIET - DISSUADE - DOMINEER - FOREBODE - FRIGHTEN - KEEP DOWN - KID OUT OF - OVERBEAR - OVERRIDE - PRESSURE - RAILROAD - RIDE OVER - SHANGHAI - SPLUTTER - SUPPRESS - THREATEN - WALK OVER If you have a moment, please use the voting buttons (green and red arrows) near the top of the page to let us know if we're helping with this clue.

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In the weeks leading up to the presidential election, Donald Trump has urged his followers to spend time on Election Day intimidating nonwhite voters. That appears to be his real name — or at least, there is a Steve Webb on Facebook who fits that description and is an active Trump supporter.

He tells them that after they vote on November 8, it’s their duty to go en masse to “some other place” and make sure that no one’s engaging in voter fraud. In other words, Webb, to all appearances, isn’t just planning to make voters feel “a little bit nervous” if they “can’t speak American” (i.e., might be noncitizens and might be trying to vote illegally).

The sentence employs three distinct meanings of the word buffalo: When grouped syntactically, this is equivalent to: [(Buffalonian bison) (Buffalonian bison intimidate)] intimidate (Buffalonian bison).